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lacalaveracatrina:

Nikolai Yaroshenko - Girl Student, 1883

lacalaveracatrina:

Nikolai Yaroshenko - Girl Student, 1883

(via the-paintrist)

andrewharlow:

Via Artandsciencejournal:

‘Aganetha Dyck, a Canadian artist from Manitoba, takes ordinary objects and turns them into exotic and humorous art. In the series above, Dyck covered figurines with honeycombs and beework to reveal the intricacies of communication. As Dyck stated in an interview with Mason Studio,

Honeybee communication research continues throughout the scientific and beekeeping world. Scientists and beekeepers, as well as dozens of international artists, plus a growing number of global citizens, are increasingly concerned with the health of honeybees. Communication between species is urgent. Research continues to try and prevent honeybees from disappearing from our world. The reason for the concern of disappearing honeybees is mainly due to the honeybees ability to pollinate over 40% of the world’s food supply.”

Dyck sees herself as a collaborator with the bees and finds herself amazed at their ability to create strong structures out of minimal materials. As she states,

I never cease to wonder at the honeybee’s ability to construct strong, awesome structures using the least amount of material to construct what is required. Architects around the world have studied the strength of honeycomb structures. Both architects and artists have been influenced by the honeybee’s design patterns.”

Her artworks are a combination of message and collaboration. Overall, Dyck uses the work of the bees to remind us of their importance in our daily life. For more information on Dyck’s work click here.

(via andrewharlow)

slowartday:

Magnus Gjoen

Magnus Gjoen’s prints examine how to change peoples relationship and preconceived notions of objects. Something which is potentially extremely destructive can be made into beautiful yet fragile objects of art. It’s this misconception of beauty which Magnus Gjoen wants us to see in a different light, being it weapons, animals or the human race itself. The latter which is capable of creating immense beauty but also capable of destroying it all. Taking inspiration from street and pop art and juxtapositioning it with fine art, he creates new and modern takes on old masterpieces or manipulates something powerful and strong into something fragile but beautiful. He often questions the correlation between religion, war, beauty & destruction in his art. Magnus Gjoen was born in London to Norwegian parents and studied design in London and Milan and works as a designer/graphic designer for Vivienne Westwood. (via)

The existence of good bad literature — the fact that one can be amused or excited or even moved by a book that one’s intellect simply refuses to take seriously — is a reminder that art is not the same thing as cerebration.
George Orwell on “good bad books.” See also: Orwell on why write. (via explore-blog)

(via explore-blog)

showslow:

Anish Kapoor
composition-improvisation:

Winslow Homer, Undertow, c. 1886

composition-improvisation:

Winslow Homer, Undertow, c. 1886

svell:

Portrait of Young Woman with Unicorn, Raphael, 1506.

svell:

Portrait of Young Woman with Unicorn, Raphael, 1506.

(via undare)

Rachel Niffenegger is an artist based in Chicago, IL USA.  Her sculptures and paintings transcribe the figure in transitional states: between being and ghost image; statuesque and the formless; two-dimensional and three-dimensional spaces. Her effigies are created, manipulated and destroyed through ritual; torsos are cracked, propped up and covered, faces are absorbed and imbedded in cloth, and paint is picked off and reapplied to appendages. These objects are material gestures of the psyche fulfilling the necessity to make solid objects as a permeable and porous body. Materials travel between objects and are generated through discarded works as she employs spray-painted polystyrene, sawdust, concrete, ash, hair, plaster, and paint skins.

"Wherever two dots can be interpreted as eyes, a face can be imagined."
cavetocanvas:

Asger Jorn, Untitled, 1956-57
From the Guggenheim:

From about 1948 Asger Jorn filled his canvases with swarming faces and figures, vaporous equivalents of the eccentric visages in crowd scenes by the Belgian artist James Ensor. Their scrawled, half-innocent, half-demonic features also have antecedents in the creatures of Jean Dubuffet and Paul Klee. These presences hovering on the surface of the canvas are integrated with their surroundings, scarcely distinguishable as representational forms. In the present canvas blobs of paint and linear contours coalesce into a standing, grinning human figure at the right and a bird in the center; a multitude of faces, less acutely defined, emerge, vanish, and reappear in the seething environment. Wherever two dots can be interpreted as eyes, a face can be imagined.
The sense of fantasy here is complemented by the candied color applied in thicknesses ranging from thin veneer to heavy ridges. Line incises its way through the fluffy space of this layered pigment to determine boundaries and suggest form. The dots of color sprinkled throughout anticipate the pointillism of the artist’s Luxury Paintings of the early 1960s, in which paint is dripped onto the canvas from a perforated tin can. The accidental revelation of form and the importance of chance in Jorn’s work suggest Surrealist concerns.

"Wherever two dots can be interpreted as eyes, a face can be imagined."

cavetocanvas:

Asger Jorn, Untitled, 1956-57

From the Guggenheim:

From about 1948 Asger Jorn filled his canvases with swarming faces and figures, vaporous equivalents of the eccentric visages in crowd scenes by the Belgian artist James Ensor. Their scrawled, half-innocent, half-demonic features also have antecedents in the creatures of Jean Dubuffet and Paul Klee. These presences hovering on the surface of the canvas are integrated with their surroundings, scarcely distinguishable as representational forms. In the present canvas blobs of paint and linear contours coalesce into a standing, grinning human figure at the right and a bird in the center; a multitude of faces, less acutely defined, emerge, vanish, and reappear in the seething environment. Wherever two dots can be interpreted as eyes, a face can be imagined.

The sense of fantasy here is complemented by the candied color applied in thicknesses ranging from thin veneer to heavy ridges. Line incises its way through the fluffy space of this layered pigment to determine boundaries and suggest form. The dots of color sprinkled throughout anticipate the pointillism of the artist’s Luxury Paintings of the early 1960s, in which paint is dripped onto the canvas from a perforated tin can. The accidental revelation of form and the importance of chance in Jorn’s work suggest Surrealist concerns.

oldpainting:

Albert Lynch, The Letter on Flickr.
Click image for 1000 x 1388 size.

oldpainting:

Albert Lynch, The Letter on Flickr.

Click image for 1000 x 1388 size.

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